Children’s Bible Program – Level 3: Lesson 15 “God Speaks the Ten Commandments”

Sweet Publishing | FreeBibleImages.org

By Janth English

Read Together: The children of Israel had been busy preparing to come before God for three days. As God approached the mountain, there were thunder and lightning strikes; the mountain quaked and the ground where they stood shook. There was an awesome display of God’s power as He descended to the mountain! Even Moses, who had been in God’s presence before, was so afraid that he too trembled! The top of the mountain looked to be on fire as God thundered the Ten Commandments from its midst. The display was to show the Israelites how mighty and powerful God is, so that they would remember and obey Him. Sadly, the Israelites were so overwhelmed by the power of God that they pleaded with Moses to ask Him not to speak to them directly anymore, because they feared they would die. God asked the Israelites to keep the Ten Commandments so He could bless them, and they agreed.

Read Together: Exodus 19:12–25; 20:1–26

Discuss:

  • Explain that the Ten Commandments are still in effect today (Matthew 5:17–18).
  • Why is the Sabbath Commandment important?
  • Explain that the Ten Commandments were given by God for our good; they are not a burden (1 John 5:3).
  • Discuss the beneficial effects of the Ten Commandments. What would the world be like if no one told lies, or if no one took what didn’t belong to him or her? How would the world be transformed if everyone put God first and loved Him?
  • Discuss the relationship between obedience to the Ten Commandments and the peace humanity desires. Help your child understand that it is breaking God’s laws that leads to the unhappiness mankind experiences. Use an example like stealing or lying to demonstrate this.

Review Memorization.

Exodus 20:1–17 – The Ten Commandments (long form)

Printable PDF – L3.15

Children’s Bible Program – Level 2: Lesson 15 “The Tower of Babel”

Sweet Publishing | FreeBibleImages.org

By Janth English

Read Together: The city of Babel was the beginning of Nimrod’s empire, and the beginning of mankind’s post-Flood attempt to govern himself apart from God. Nimrod led the people to build a very tall tower in rebellion against Him. But God was not pleased with their actions, so God decided to confuse the people’s language. They couldn’t share ideas and so they weren’t able to keep working on the tower. The word “Babel” itself means confusion, and you can imagine what happened when God confused the languages. Only those who spoke the same language could understand each other, and God divided the languages along family lines. People stayed with those they could understand, and they began to settle in their own territories as God wanted them to. Needless to say, work on the tower ceased. The Tower of Babel was never completed, but the attitude of mankind’s rebellion against God continues to this day.

Read Together: Genesis 11:1–9

Discuss:

  • Ask what the people of Babel did to show their defiance toward God.
  • Ask your child to imagine working on a group assignment when suddenly he or she could not understand anything other members of the team were saying. Would they be able to work together as a team? This is the same situation that occurred in Babel when God confused the languages.
  • Point out to your child that God wants people to communicate and understand one another. This is why He will restore a pure language to mankind in the Millennium (Zephaniah 3:9).

Review Memorization.

Genesis 11:9 “Therefore its name is called Babel, because there the LORD confused the language of all the earth; and from there the LORD scattered them abroad over the face of all the earth.”

Printable PDF – L2.15

Children’s Bible Program – Level 1: Lesson 15 “Noah, the Ark, and the Flood”

Sweet Publishing | FreeBibleImages.org

By Janth English

Read Together: Following God’s instructions, Noah immediately began to build an ark to save his family and the land animals from destruction. Noah and his sons, Shem, Ham, and Japheth, may have worked on building the ark for many years. While the people surely made fun of him for building a boat on dry land, Noah warned them to repent and obey God so that they too could escape the coming Flood. No one but his family listened to Noah. In the end, there were only eight people that entered the ark: Noah, Shem, Ham, Japheth, and their wives. God sent seven pairs of every clean animal to the ark, males and females, so He could preserve their lives. He also sent two of every unclean animal, a male and a female, as well as seven pairs of birds, males and females, for Noah to keep in the ark. After Noah, his family, and all the animals were inside, God sealed the door to the ark. After seven days, it began to rain. The waters from under the earth gushed up and the rain from heaven poured down, for forty days and forty nights! The water was so high that it covered the mountains! Only those on the ark survived.

Read Together: Genesis 6:13–22; 7:1–20; 2 Peter 2:5

Discuss:

  • Ask your child why God destroyed all land animals, birds, and human beings. Ask why God spared Noah and his family.
  • Ask your child how many people were aboard the ark and who they were.
  • Explain to your child that during the time that he was building the ark, Noah was warning the people about the coming Flood. God was giving them an opportunity to repent and be saved. Emphasize God’s mercy in wanting the people to be saved.
  • Explain to your child what makes animals “clean” or “unclean.” Why did God tell Noah to take more clean animals on the ark than unclean? You may want to use this as an opportunity to talk about God’s dietary laws in Leviticus.

Review Memorization.

2 Peter 2:5 “And [God] did not spare the ancient world, but saved Noah, one of eight people, a preacher of righteousness, bringing in the flood on the world of the ungodly.”

Printable PDF – L1.15

Children’s Bible Program – Level 3: Lesson 14 “God and Israel: A Marriage Covenant”

By Janth English

Read Together: Have you ever been to a wedding? Think back to the ceremony and the wedding vows. You may remember that the minister asks the groom if he is willing to be a faithful husband. That means, is he willing to provide for, protect, and cherish his soon-to-be wife. In the same ceremony, the bride is asked if she is willing to love, honor, and obey her soon-to-be husband. They both must answer “I do” or else they don’t get married! And when they say “I do,” they have entered a covenant, which is a solemn promise to do what they said they would do. When you read Exodus 19:3–8, you can see that God proposed to take care of Israel in response to her obedience. If Israel would obey, God promised prosperity, peace, and safety. When all Israel said, “I do,” they promised to obey God. But sadly, they did not keep that promise. However, that is not the end of the story! Today, the Church is the “Bride of Christ,” which is preparing to marry Jesus at the resurrection. That means that each person, when baptized, agrees to enter into a marriage covenant with Christ (meaning, to honor and obey Him). In return, Jesus Christ, as the Church’s Husband, promises to love and faithfully care for each member of His Church. The marriage between Jesus Christ and the Church will take place at the resurrection, just before the Millennium begins. As all brides do, we look forward to that glorious event!

Read Together: Exodus 19:5, 8; Leviticus 26:1–6; Jeremiah 3:14, 20; Ephesians 5:31–32; Revelation 19:7–9

Discuss:

  • Discuss with your child the relationship between Jesus Christ, who was the God of the Old Testament (1 Corinthians 10:4), and ancient Israel. Did God perform His duties? How did ancient Israel respond?
  • Discuss the relationship with Jesus Christ and the Church. Show how it is an intimate family relationship. Use this as an opportunity to discuss the roles of fathers, mothers, and children in the family.
  • Explain that if your child is old enough to be baptized before Christ returns, he or she will have the opportunity to be part of the bride of Christ, too.

Review Memorization: Exodus 20:1–17, The Ten Commandments (long form)

Printable PDF – L3.14

Children’s Bible Program – Level 2: Lesson 14 “Nimrod’s Kingdom”

The Bible Journey – thebiblejourney.com | FreeBibleImages.org

By Janth English

Read Together: The people began to put their faith and trust in Nimrod, and Nimrod began to feel very proud of himself. The name Nimrod can mean “rebel,” and Nimrod was truly a rebel. Nimrod is known in history to be a ruler who turned people from the true worship of God and caused religious confusion. According to some historical sources, he began to gather people together in cities rather than encouraging them to spread out over the earth as God wanted. Initially, the reason for keeping people together might have been for protection. But it soon became clear that Nimrod wanted the people together so he could be a powerful ruler, and he became a cruel tyrant over them. Nimrod set out to establish a world-ruling kingdom and his first city was Babel. He also founded Erech, Accad, and Calneh in the land of Shinar which is near modern-day Iraq. He also took lands in Assyria that were occupied by the descendants of Shem, which included Nineveh, Rehoboth Ir, Calah, and Resen. This was likely not done peacefully, and it is probable that Nimrod introduced war again to the human family after the Flood.

Read Together: Genesis 10:6–12

Discuss:

  • Help your child identify ways in which history suggests Nimrod rebelled against God.
  • Nimrod was born in the third generation after the flood. Discuss with your child how short the time was before mankind forgot the lessons of the Flood. This is a good opportunity to discuss the fact that people who don’t learn from their mistakes are often doomed to repeat them.
  • Nimrod was a “mighty hunter” who helped the people in the beginning. But history says he had pride and credited himself for his accomplishments. Ask your student how humility might have helped Nimrod. Take this opportunity to talk about servant leadership.

Review Memorization:

Genesis 11:9 “Therefore its name is called Babel, because there the LORD confused the language of all the earth; and from there the LORD scattered them abroad over the face of all the earth.”

 

Printable PDF – L2.14

Children’s Bible Program – Level 1: Lesson 14 “Noah Finds Grace”

By Janth English 

Read Together: There was one man during this wicked age (the time before the flood) who continued to follow God’s laws. His name was Noah, and Noah was a just man. That means he tried to treat everyone fairly, as the Bible teaches us to do, and just like we want to be treated in turn. He followed the example of his great-grandfather Enoch, who had also walked with God. “Walking with God” means that Enoch and Noah loved God and obeyed Him. God says that He shows His servants when He is going to send destruction on people because of their sins (Amos 3:7). Noah was a faithful servant of God, and God told Noah that He planned to destroy the earth with a flood, but would save Noah and his family because of his obedience to God.

Read Together: Genesis 5:21–32; 6:8–10; 13–14

Discuss:

  • Explain to your child that people lived very long lives before the Flood.
  • Ask your child how Noah must have felt living in such a wicked society.
  • What do you think about God being merciful to Noah and his family and saving them from the flood? Do you think they were happy about that?
  • Help your child understand that to be righteous means to keep God’s commandments in faith (Psalm 119:172), and that we too can be righteous.
  • Discuss with your child what it means to “walk with God.”

Review Memorization:

2 Peter 2:5 “And [God] did not spare the ancient world, but saved Noah, one of eight people, a preacher of righteousness, bringing in the flood on the world of the ungodly.”

Printable PDF – L1.14

Children’s Bible Program – Level 3: Lesson 13 “Israel Prepares to Meet God”

Author: Janth English

Read Together: God changed Jacob’s name to Israel. Israel’s descendants lived in Egypt and grew into a great nation. But the Egyptians enslaved them and put them to hard labor. God worked many miracles to free Israel from slavery. After the death of all the firstborn in Egypt, God led Israel out from Egypt under the leadership of Moses. They miraculously walked on dry land through the Red Sea, and God protected His people from the Egyptian army. God told Moses to bring the children of Israel to Him at Mt. Sinai after they left Egypt (Exodus 3:12). A few weeks after leaving Egypt, the children of Israel were encamped near Mt. Sinai, the mountain of God. God called Moses and told him to offer the people of Israel a special agreement, called a covenant. Israel would obey Him, and in return, He would make them His special people. The people agreed. God instructed the Israelites to clean up and wash their clothes, and “consecrate” themselves (which means to prepare themselves to meet with God). They were getting ready to meet their Creator!

Read Together: Exodus 1:1–14; 14:5–31; 19:1–11

Discuss:

  • Explain that even though they had witnessed God’s miraculous interventions, Israel had not been obedient since leaving Egypt. They complained about the water and food (Exodus 15:22–25; 16:2–3). They broke the Sabbath (Exodus 16:26–29). And they complained against Moses (Exodus 17:2–3). Explain that experiencing miracles does not make it automatic that a person will respond by having faith in God.  We still have to choose to obey and respond to Him.
  • Ask your child why he or she thinks God told Israel to bathe and wash their clothes. What preparation would one make to visit the Queen of England? Use this as an opportunity to emphasize why we dress up for Sabbath services.
  • Discuss what it means to be “consecrated,” which means “set apart for holy use.” Explain that the Church is the Israel of God and that we are set apart by God’s Holy Spirit. Help your child understand that if our parents (or parent) is baptized and in the Church, that means that we have a chance to have a relationship with God that we otherwise wouldn’t have (Acts 2:38–39, 1 Corinthians 7:14)

Review Memorization:

Exodus 20:1–17 The Ten Commandments (long form)

 

Printable PDF – L3.13

Children’s Bible Program – Level 2: Lesson 13 “Nimrod the Mighty Hunter”

Author: Janth English

Read Together: God saved eight people from the great flood He brought upon the earth: Noah and his wife, his sons Shem, Ham, and Japheth, and his sons’ wives. The sons of Noah began to have children, and their families grew into all the nations of the world. The names of their descendants (children, grandchildren, etc.) can be found in Genesis 10. Even as these families grew into tribes and nations, the earth was still very sparsely populated. One of the sons of Ham was named Cush, and one of the sons of Cush was named Nimrod, who was a mighty hunter. The people began to trust in Nimrod for their protection in place of God Almighty. They called Nimrod “the mighty hunter before the LORD” (Genesis 10:9). People began to idolize him, and most of them soon forgot the lessons of the Flood.

Read Together: Genesis 9:18–19; 10:1–8, 13–32; Acts 17:26

Discuss:

  • Explain to your child that knowing the names of the ancient peoples and lands they lived in is important because it helps us identify their descendants today. This also helps us understand prophecies that affect them.
  • Discuss Acts 17:26 with your child. Explain that Acts 17:26 shows that God has given different parts of Noah’s family different lands to inherit.
  • Ask your child to picture himself or herself on the earth about 100 years after the flood. Would it be frightening to live in an area where wild animals outnumber humans? What would be the natural thing to do? What should they have done?
  • Ask your child what lessons he or she thinks people should have learned from the Flood. How does the people’s attitude toward Nimrod show they had not learned those lessons?

Review Memorization:

Genesis 11:9 “Therefore its name is called Babel, because there the LORD confused the language of all the earth; and from there the LORD scattered them abroad over the face of all the earth.”

Printable PDF – L2.13

Children’s Bible Program – Level 1: Lesson 13 “The Earth Before the Flood”

Sweet Publishing | FreeBibleImages.org

Author: Janth English

Read Together: The people on the earth had become very wicked before the flood. In fact, the Bible says that they were thinking bad thoughts all the time! People were hurting other people, and the suffering was very great. When He saw how bad things were, God was sorry that He made man.  It was painful for Him to see people treating each other that way. He decided to destroy all the wicked people by sending a flood to cover the earth. God who is merciful did not want to destroy the good and obedient people with the wicked. So, He looked for someone on the earth who was obedient to Him, and He found Noah.

Read Together: Genesis 6:1–12

Discuss:

  • Talk to your child about what it means to be disobedient to God. Explain to them that disobedience can lead to “wickedness” and how this way of life hurts people.
  • Ask your child to picture what it would be like if you were the only people in your neighborhood who were being good, and all the other people were naughty. Remind them that only one person was left who was really obeying God!
  • Ask your child how God must have felt to see all the people he created being bad. Relate it to a situation they have experienced. (Example: “How does Mom feel when you are naughty and doing things you shouldn’t be doing?”)
  • Take this opportunity to explain the Great White Throne Judgment period (Revelation 20:11). One day, God will give everyone who has ever lived a chance to obey and follow Him, and be blessed for obedience.

Review Memorization:

2 Peter 2:5 “And [God] did not spare the ancient world, but saved Noah, one of eight people, a preacher of righteousness, bringing in the flood on the world of the ungodly.”

Printable PDF – L1.13

Children’s Bible Program – Level 2: Lesson 12 “Noah’s Family Expands”

Moody Publishers | FreeBibleimages.org

Author: Janth English

Read Together: Did you know that Noah’s name means “rest”? His name showed the hope his father had that God would use Noah to bring deliverance to His people. And of course, that’s what God did. God used Noah to preserve the human race. When Noah and his family left the ark, God commanded them to be fruitful and multiply. This means God wanted them to have large families. All nations, races, ethnicities, and cultures–all people today can trace their lineage back to Noah. Noah saw many of his children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren because he lived for 350 years after the flood. He lived a total of 950 years, which was common for people in the pre-flood era. However, after the flood, the length of most people’s life began to shorten. Within about five generations after the flood, people were living less than two hundred years. Noah also lived to see, just as God had said, that man’s heart is inclined toward evil (Genesis 8:21). People did not learn from the problems of the pre-flood world. Not long after the flood, the human family was again walking contrary to God.

Read Together: Genesis 5:28–29; 9:18–29; 10:1–32

Parents:

  • Help your student to see how families are the structural building blocks of society.  Notice that families grown large became nations.
  • Point out to your child the care that God took to record the descendants of Shem, Ham, and Japheth and where they lived. One reason for this is so that we can identify modern nations by their ancient names.
  • Noah was a preacher of righteousness before and after the flood (2 Peter 2:5). He also was the elder and leader (“patriarch,” which means the male head of a family or tribe) of his growing family. Discuss with your child why people did not listen to Noah. Explain that human beings have freedom of choice, but that Satan the devil influences their decisions.
  • The people did not listen to the wisdom of Noah who was a “preacher of righteousness” (2 Pet 2:5). Ask if this is a common problem in families today. Think aloud with your child about Proverbs 1:7–8; 10:21. Ask your child if they can think of an incident in which things went wrong because someone failed to listen to their elders.

Review memorization:

Genesis 6:9 “This is the genealogy of Noah. Noah was a just man, perfect [upright, blameless, or wholehearted] in his generations. Noah walked with God.”


Printable PDF – L1.11

Printable PDF – L1.9-L1.12