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Children’s Bible Program – Level 3: Lesson 33 “Ruth Gets Married”

Featured Passage: Ruth 3-4

 Boaz was a prominent man in the community, having great wealth and many servants. He was also a close relative of Elimelech, Naomi’s deceased husband. Ruth had found favor with Boaz, and Naomi thought to secure Ruth’s future with him. The law of redemption allowed the nearest of kin to purchase the family land and to marry the widow of the one who owned it. Naomi instructed Ruth to secretly go to Boaz one night, with this statute in mind, and express her desire to put herself into his care. She said  to Boaz, “Take your maidservant under your wing, for you are a close relative.” She was basically asking Boaz to marry her! Boaz was glad that she came to him, and said he would be willing to take care of her, only there was a problem. There was another man who was more closely related to her than Boaz. This other man would have to decide not to redeem the land and marry Ruth if Boaz was to have a chance to do so himself. Not wanting to waste any time, Boaz got up early in the morning and went to the gate of the city to see what could be done. The decision made that day would determine what would happen to Ruth and Naomi. 

Discuss:

Richard Gunther (www.lambsongs.co.nz) | FreeBibleImages.org
  • The book of Ruth is one of  two books in the Bible that has a woman’s name in the title.
  • Consider the character and honor that Boaz displayed in the book of Ruth. What were some things that he did which reflected favorably on his character? 
  • True love always shows outgoing concern for others and does no harm. When Boaz showed concern for Ruth’s reputation and went to great lengths to protect her name. What are some other examples of true love from the book of Ruth?

Memory Challenge: 

Ruth 3:10-11

Then he said, “Blessed are you of the Lord, my daughter! For you have shown more kindness at the end than at the beginning, in that you did not go after young men, whether poor or rich. And now, my daughter, do not fear. I will do for you all that you request, for all the people of my town know that you are a virtuous woman.”



Level 3: Lesson 32 “Ruth Finds Favor with Boaz”

 Featured Passage: Ruth 2

It was now up to Ruth to look after her mother-in-law. As the barley harvest began she went to a nearby grain field. Little did she know that was owned by Boaz, one of Naomi’s relatives. It was customary to let poor people pick up the leftover grain that was missed by the men who were harvesting. Ruth bent to the work, gleaning the barley, unaware that Boaz was watching. Kind-hearted Boaz asked his men who this diligent and hard-working woman was. When one of his servants explained who Ruth was, and how she had left her homeland to care for Naomi, he was deeply impressed. He spoke to Ruth, inviting her to eat and drink with his servants. He then instructed her to harvest  the barley sheaves alongside his servants. No longer would she have to pick up the leftover grain. Not only did this make her work easier, but she could collect a lot more grain in the same amount of time. Boaz took responsibility to protect her and help her, just as she had done for her aging mother-in-law. When Ruth returned home and told her about the kindness of the landowner, showing her the overflowing basket of barley, Naomi asked who the man was. When she learned that this generous, caring man was her close relative, Boaz, she understood how God’s hand had turned to favor her. 

Discuss:

Richard Gunther (www.lambsongs.co.nz) | FreeBibleImages.org
  • Ruth’s works demonstrate her character. Christ said we can know a person’s character by their fruits (Luke 6:44–45). The Bible also says that even a child is known by their deeds (Proverbs 20:11).
  • Ruth had stopped serving idols to serve the one true God. She had left everything she knew to be among the people of God. We, as Christians, must be willing to forsake everything to serve God. What does it mean for us to give up everything to serve God?  
  • The Bible says that God rewards those who diligently seek Him (Hebrews 11:6). God often does this by blessing our efforts. Ruth worked very hard, and as God promises, He blessed her efforts.

Memory Challenge:

Ruth 2:12

“The Lord repay your work, and a full reward be given you by the Lord God of Israel, under whose wings you have come for refuge.”

Children’s Bible Program – Level 3: Lesson 31 “Ruth in the Land of Judah”

 Ruth 1-2

Ruth and Naomi arrived in Bethlehem of Judea during the spring at the beginning of the barley harvest. Naomi was well known in Bethlehem and when the people saw that Naomi had returned they were excited! Naomi told them that she was mourning. She no longer had a husband to take care of her. But, she had Ruth! God has a statute that allows the poor to gather produce that the reapers leave in the fields during harvest time. Ruth decided that she would glean in the fields to support her mother-in-law. Gleaning was very hard work  but each day Ruth walked to the fields where she toiled from sunrise to sunset gathering what the reapers had left. Ruth worked very hard to take care of Naomi, and people began to notice.

Discuss:

Richard Gunther (www.lambsongs.co.nz) | FreeBibleImages.org
  • Ruth and Naomi arrived in Bethlehem during the barley harvest. The wavesheaf offering during the Days of Unleavened Bread marked the beginning of the barley harvest which always occurs in the spring (Leviticus 23:10–14).
  • God’s law includes statutes to provide for the needs of the poor, yet the poor are still expected to work. How is this different than the way different governments take care of the poor people today? 
  • What are some of the ways Ruth displayed diligence?

Memory Challenge: 

Ruth 1:22  

So Naomi returned, and Ruth the Moabitess her daughter-in-law with her, who returned from the country of Moab. Now they came to Bethlehem at the beginning of barley harvest.

Children’s Bible Program – Level 3: Lesson 30 “Ruth the Moabitess”

Featured Passage: Ruth 1

The book of Ruth is a story of friendship, commitment, adversity, triumph and true love. The setting is in the time of the judges. Israel had turned her back on God, so He brought a famine upon the land to punish them for their rebellion. A man named Elimelech, along with his wife Naomi and sons Mahlon and Chilion, left their home in Bethlehem, and traveled to neighboring Moab in hopes of escaping the famine. But hard times followed them. First, Elimelech died, leaving Naomi a widow. Then after ten years of marriage, Naomi’s sons Mahlon and Chilion died, leaving both of their young wives without a husband. All three women face a hopeless situation, as widows without the  protection of a husband or father. One of Naomi’s daughter-in-laws, Ruth, rises to the occasion, and gives us an example of love and service that continues to inspire us today.  

Discuss:  

Richard Gunther (www.lambsongs.co.nz) | FreeBibleImages.org
  • The Moabites were descendants of Lot, Abraham’s nephew. Also, the Moabites opposed the children of Israel when they left Egypt, and there was a history of animosity between the two peoples (Deuteronomy 23:3–6).
  • During the time of Ruth, women depended on their husbands or sons to protect them. Ruth knew that Naomi had neither so she volunteered to take on that role.
  • Ruth showed great respect, love, and commitment to her mother-in-law  She also courageously made a huge sacrifice to leave everything familiar to her to go to a place where she might not be accepted because she was a Moabitess. What do you think it was like for Ruth to make that decision? 

Memory Challenge: 

Ruth 1:16  

But Ruth said: “Entreat me not to leave you, or to turn back from following after you; for wherever you go, I will go; and wherever you lodge, I will lodge; your people shall be my people, and your God, my God.”

Children’s Bible Program: Special Edition! What is Pentecost? – Part 2

This Study Guide is a continuation of “What is Pentecost?-Part 1”.

This set of study guides are written for the purpose of helping parents teach their children vital Biblical topics in a focused, easy-to-follow format. Each section is not meant to be taught in one lesson, rather the topics are organized so parents can choose specific areas of focus and gear lessons toward the learning styles and ages of their children. Each topic is presented in a straightforward manner with accompanying verses for study. The main study should always come from the Scripture itself, while these lessons can act as a guide for reading passages from the Bible. Each Lesson packet includes memory verses, questions for meaningful discussion, and activities (added at the end of the packet). Also, though some things may be labeled as Level 1, 2, or 3, the activities, questions, and scriptures for memorizing can be used to fit the needs and learning levels for children of all ages. Missed part one? Click here for “What is Pentecost?-Part 1”.

The beginning of the New Testament

is the record of the beginning of a new era in God’s plan. The four gospel books (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John) tell the history of Jesus Christ as a human being on this earth. Though these books do not include every little thing Jesus Christ did while He lived as a human being, (John said at the end of his book that he didn’t think there could be enough room in all the books in the whole world to record everything that Jesus did!), God did give us enough details of His life for us to learn to be like Him. So what does Christ have to do with Pentecost. Well, just about everything! After Jesus came and lived a perfect life on earth and died for every single person in the whole world, He was resurrected to eternal life. He was the first one to be given that gift, (He is the First of the Firstfruits) and He did it so we all could have a chance to be resurrected to eternal life too!

Let’s have a look at what happened on the first Pentecost after Jesus Christ was raised from the grave!

Children’s Bible Program: Special Edition! Pentecost 2019

For this year’s Holy Day season we are offering our newest initiative for our Children’s Bible Program. It will be a special set of Study Guides titled “What is Pentecost?” geared toward families with children of all ages. Don’t wait to download this special study guide before the beginning of Pentecost! We hope that this set of special study guides will greatly enhance family preparation for this Holy Day season!

This Study Guide is written for the purpose of helping parents teach their children vital Biblical topics in a focused, easy-to-follow format. Each section is not meant to be taught in one lesson, rather the topics are organized so parents can choose specific areas of focus and gear lessons toward the learning styles and ages of their children. Each topic is presented in a straightforward manner with accompanying verses for study. The main study should always come from the Scripture itself, while these lessons can act as a guide for reading passages from the Bible. Each Lesson packet includes memory verses, questions for meaningful discussion, and activities (added at the end of the packet). Also, though some things may be labeled as Level 1, 2, or 3, the activities, questions, and scriptures for memorizing can be used to fit the needs and learning levels for children of all ages. Enjoy!

God wanted a family,

and from the beginning He made a plan for His children. Do you remember Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob? God worked with each of these men, and because they obeyed him, he decided to work out His plan through them to have a family. The children of Jacob (whose name you might remember God changed to “Israel”) would become the example children for the rest of the world. God wants all people to be His children, but He had to start with a few people first to be an example for everyone else. So God was working out His plan for all people on earth through the example of the Children of Israel!

So what does this have to do with Pentecost? Just wait and see!

Children’s Bible Program – Level 3: Lesson 29 “Pentecost and God’s Plan of Salvation”

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Read Together: Before time began, God, who became the Father, and the Word, who became Jesus Christ, planned to have a family. The plan was to create human beings in God’s image and place them on the earth where they could learn to choose God’s way and develop godly character. God recognized that under the influence of Satan the devil, mankind would choose to sin, but He had a plan for that as well. Most of humanity, including those who profess Christianity, do not understand God’s plan, but we can. Through His Holy Days, God has revealed His plan to redeem mankind and offer every human being an opportunity for eternal life. The first step in God’s plan, Passover, has already been fulfilled. The Word was born as a human to pay for the sins of mankind by dying for His creation. Pentecost teaches us that God will begin to work with a small number of people through the power of His Holy Spirit. It pictures a harvest of the few that God is working with now who will one day assist Christ in the millennium. Jesus Christ was resurrected from the dead and is now our High Priest awaiting the time when He will return to the earth as King of kings. The firstfruits will be the kings who will rule with Christ in the future.

Read Together: Leviticus 23:15–21; 1 Peter 1:18–21; Revelation 13:8; John 1:29, 36; 1 Corinthians 5:7; Hebrews 4:14–15; Revelation 14:3–4; 17:14.

Discuss:

  • God’s plan to have a family is a central theme throughout the Holy Scriptures. Much of the Bible is a history of what God has done, is doing, and will do to bring about His plan.
  • Ask your child explain the meaning of the first three Festivals in God’s plan of salvation.
  • God gives understanding to those who do what He says (Psalm 111:10). Obedience comes before understanding. Use as an example Mr. Armstrong keeping the Holy Days before God revealed their meaning. Explain that we may not understand everything now (1 Corinthians 13:12).

Children’s Bible Program – Level 3: Lesson 28 “Samuel – The Last Judge”

Read Together: Samuel had an uncommonly fascinating beginning.  Hannah was childless. In her sorrow, she prayed to God for a child, vowing that she would dedicate him to God. God heard her prayer and Samuel was born. When Samuel was weaned, his mother took him to live and serve in the tabernacle with Eli the priest. God spoke to Samuel while he was yet a child, and it became clear that God had chosen Samuel to be a prophet. After Eli’s death, Samuel judged throughout the land of Israel. When Samuel grew old, he appointed his sons as judges to assist him. But his sons were evil, and did not follow in his footsteps. The people revolted against Samuel, and demanded a king. This was disconcerting to Samuel after all his years of faithful service, but God reassured him. The truth was that they had rejected God – not Samuel.  With God’s approval, Samuel anointed two kings of Israel—Saul and David. It was Samuel’s leadership that helped Israel transition from a theocracy that was managed by judges under God to one in which the people were subjects of a king. Samuel, the last judge of Israel, lived in very exciting times, and his story is recorded in the Scriptures, waiting to inspire you.

Richard Gunther (www.lambsongs.con.nz) | FreeBibleImages.org

Read Together: 1 Samuel 1–10;16:1–13; 25:1.

Discuss:

  • What might it have been like for Samuel to grow up serving in the tabernacle from the time he was about four years old? God can use people no matter their age if they are willing to serve. What are some ways you might be able to serve in the congregation?
  • The sons of Eli and Samuel had great opportunities because of their fathers, but they threw them away. Explain to your child that they also have great opportunities as a young person in God’s Church.
  • Even though Israel demanded a king, God chose who would be king. There was no voting. This may be a good opportunity to discuss different forms of human government and how they differ from God’s form of government.
  • Samuel lived in very exciting times. As you read through the entire book of 1 Samuel, have your child identify their favorite scene, character, and miracle in the book.

Review Memorization:

Judges 21:25  “In those days there was no king in Israel; everyone did what was right in his own eyes.”

Children’s Bible Program – Level 3: Lesson 27 “Gideon”

Read Together: When we read about Gideon in the book of Judges, we see that, once again, the children of Israel were in trouble. Year after year, the Midianites swarmed across the land of Israel. These nomadic people would set up their camps, allowing their camels and livestock to roam over the land, eating all the crops of the Israelites, leaving nothing. The children of Israel were left with no food for themselves. They hid in caves to escape the Midianites, with no food and no hope. Finally, they cried out to God to deliver them. The story of what happened next is one of the most amazing stories of bravery in the whole book of Judges. God used Gideon and 300 men to save Israel from the Midianite hordes. Read on to learn how!

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Read Together:  Judges 6-8

Discuss:

  • Did Gideon blame God for Israel’s problems (Judges 6:13)? Explain that people often blame God, but it is usually because of sin that bad things happen. To help illustrate this point, you may want to select an appropriate news story and discuss how the calamity is a result of sin.
  • God does not leave people unaware of their sins and its consequences (Judges 6:8–10). Why did God allow the Midianites to terrorize Israel? Discuss the Church’s role in warning modern day Israel.
  • Why did God have Gideon send all but 300 warriors home?
  • Discuss with your child how Gideon tested God. God was very patient with Gideon by doing as he asked in order to help Gideon to trust Him.
  • The people wanted to make Gideon their king. What was Gideon’s response?

Review Memorization:

Judges 21:25  “In those days there was no king in Israel; everyone did what was right in his own eyes.”

Children’s Bible Program – Level 3: Lesson 26 “Deborah the Prophetess – Judge of Israel”

Read Together:  In Judges 4, we read that God chose a woman, Deborah, to judge Israel for a period of time. She was well prepared when God called her to be a prophetess and a judge because she knew God’s laws and was wise in their execution.  God told Deborah to send for Barak and tell him to fight against their oppressors – Jabin, king of Canaan and Sisera, the commander of his army. Barak responded that he would only go if Deborah went with him. Though Deborah knew women did not normally fight in war she agreed to go, but Barak would have to sacrifice the glory of the victory to a woman. God gave them the battle plan which they executed with precision. Barak along with ten thousand troops from Napthali and Zebulun soon had Sisera and his troops on the run. They killed them all, but Sisera escaped from the battle to the tent of Jael, a woman whom he thought was an ally. While Sisera slept, she drove a tent peg through his head, and Jael became the heroine of the battle instead of Barak just as Deborah had said. This marked the end of Jabin’s oppression, and Israel had peace for forty years. Yet after all this, Israel again turned to her evil ways.

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Read Together:  Judges 4:1 – 6:1

Discuss:

  • Discuss with your child the role of a prophet(ess) and the role of a judge.  What is the role of women in the Church government structure? (See Ephesians 4:11.)
  • Speculate with your child why God might have called a woman to judge Israel at that time.  Perhaps she was the best qualified. Remember, God is not a respecter of persons (Romans 2:11).
  • Point out to your child that Deborah is not the only prophetess referred to in the scriptures(See Exodus 15:20; 2 Kings 22:14; Isaiah 8:3; Luke 2:36).
  • Ask your child why they feel Barak wanted Deborah to go with him to war. Was Barak’s bravery in question? Remember, Barak is listed in the faith chapter of Hebrews 11
  • Explain to your child that those born into the family of God are neither male nor female (Galatians 3:28).  Everyone will have equal opportunity to serve in the Kingdom of God and and be rewarded based on your works (Matthew 16:27).

Review Memorization:

Judges 21:25  “In those days there was no king in Israel; everyone did what was right in his own eyes.”