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Children’s Bible Program – Level 2: Lesson 24 “Eating Unleavened Bread—Putting on Righteousness”

Read Together: God told ancient Israel that they were to put out all leavening from their homes, and He also instructed them to eat unleavened bread for seven days. The first and seventh days were to be holy convocations.God’s people continue to observe the Feast of Unleavened Bread by eating unleavened bread for seven days and celebrating the first and seventh days as Holy Days. These days have important meanings in God’s plan for mankind. Passover commemorates Christ’s sacrifice in payment of our sins. The Days of Unleavened Bread picture our effort to put sin out of our lives and replace it with living according to God’s ways. We don’t just avoid doing bad things. We must fill our lives wit good actions, just like our elder brother Jesus Christ.

Read Together:  Exodus 12:14–17; Leviticus 23:6–8; Ephesians 4:22–24; John 6:47–51; Galatians 2:20; 2 Timothy 3:16–17; Philippians 1:6; Hebrews 12:2

  • Discuss with your child the biblical meaning of righteousness. Read and discuss Psalm 119:172 together.
  • Remind your child that the Feast of Unleavened Bread is the only one that has two Holy Days and that Passover is a separate feast but it is not a Sabbath.
  • Ask your child to summarize the meaning of the Passover and Days of Unleavened Bread, the first two steps in God’s plan of salvation.

Discuss:

Review Memorization.

1 Corinthians 5:7  “Therefore purge out the old leaven, that you may be a new lump, since you truly are unleavened. For indeed Christ, our Passover, was sacrificed for us.”

Children’s Bible Program – Level 2: Lesson 23 “Putting Sin Out”

Read Together: When God delivered ancient Israel from Egypt, they left in a hurry. They left so quickly that they were unable to let their dough rise, so their bread was unleavened. God told Israel they were to remember the day that He brought them out of Egypt by observing the Feast of Unleavened Bread for seven days. The first and last days of the feast were to be Holy Days or annual Sabbaths. As they prepared for these days they were to remove all the leavening from their homes. God commanded the Israelites to do this and instruct their children to pass on this command to the next generation. But we understand that the command applies to us as members of the church of God also. You have probably helped your parents clean the leavening from your home before the Days of Unleavened Bread each year. It can take a lot of time and hard work! But, why is it important? Here’s the answer.

Remember, God brought ancient Israel out of slavery in Egypt. For the Israelites, Egypt represented the years of slavery they had endured. Today, God calls each member of His church and frees them from slavery also. But our slavery is not to the kingdom of Egypt. Our slavery is to sin. Even though we don’t want to, we sometimes break God’s law out of rebelliousness and selfishness. That is like being a slave of sin. For us, God uses leaven to represent our slavery.  What is leaven? Leaven is the yeast that is added to bread to make it rise, which makes it more enjoyable to eat. Without that leaven, bread is hard and flat. Just like the yeast that makes bread rise, sin causes us to grow in pride, vanity and selfishness. And as we remove leavening or any bread that has been made with leavening from our homes, we are practicing an exercise that reminds us of removing sin from our life!

Read Together:  Exodus 12:15–17, 33–34, 39; 13:3–10; Leviticus 23:6–8; John 6:44; Matthew 16:6; 1 Corinthians 13:4; 5:6–8; Romans 6:12–14

Discuss:

  • Help your child name some leavened products that you are to throw out and avoid during the Days of Unleavened Bread.
  • Discuss with your child what sin is and have them read 1 John 3:4 (KJV). Help your child recognize that just as we are to carefully stay away from leavening during the Days of Unleavened Bread, we are to be especially diligent to keep sin out of our lives.
  • Try to think of a humorous event that happened to your family during the Days of Unleavened Bread. What was the oddest place that you found leavening? Were you ever in a situation where you temporarily forgot it was the Days of Unleavened Bread? What do you do when these things happen? Help your child to understand that when we repent of sin, God is quick to forgive us. This is how we remain unleavened.

Review Memorization:

1 Corinthians 5:7  “Therefore purge out the old leaven, that you may be a new lump, since you truly are unleavened. For indeed Christ, our Passover, was sacrificed for us.”

Children’s Bible Program – Level 2: Lesson 22 “Passover and the Sacrificial Lamb”

Photo by Daniel Sandvik on Unsplash

Read Together: God gave ancient Israel instructions concerning Passover observance. On the tenth day in the first month of the year, each family was told to select a special, Passover lamb. This lamb was to be perfect, without any blemishes at all. Four days later, as the 14th day of the first month was just beginning at sunset, they were required to kill the lamb, cook it, and eat it as part of a special Passover meal, putting some of the blood of the lamb on their doorway. Those who did this would be protected from the death angel, who would kill all the firstborn in the land, except those in houses with the blood of the lamb on their doorway. Every year after that, the Israelites were commanded to eat a Passover meal on this same night and remember how God had spared them from the death of the firstborn in their home.  

But this Passover lamb also symbolized something more. All humans are under the threat of death because we all have sinned, and death is the penalty for sinning against God. We may not have the death angel passing over us, but we still are subject to death for our sins. Instead of a Passover lamb, however, we have Jesus Christ. Christ was the perfect sacrifice who was willing to become a human being and then die for our sins, protecting us from death, just as the blood of the lamb on the doorway protected the Israelites.

Read Together:  Exodus 12:3–8, 43–47; Leviticus 23:4–5; Romans 3:23; 6:23; Hebrews 10:4; John 1:1–3; Luke 1:35; Matthew 1:23; Philippians 2:5–8; John 10:17–18; 3:16; 1:29.

Discuss:

  • Ask your child why they think the lamb selected for Passover had to be without any blemishes. How does this relate to Jesus Christ?
  • People often question why Christ had to die. Discuss this with your child. Be sure to relate that God will not compromise with sin and that there could be no pardon of sins without shedding blood (Hebrews 9:22). Christ had to die to atone for mankind’s sins, giving you, your child, and every human being who has ever lived a chance for salvation and eternal life in God’s family.
  • Discuss with your child how awful sin is and why God hates it. Choose one of the Ten Commandments and talk about how breaking it causes misery, pain, and suffering. How different would the world be if that commandment was kept? Remind your student that it is because of sin that Christ had to die.

Review Memorization:

1 Corinthians 5:7  “Therefore purge out the old leaven, that you may be a new lump, since you truly are unleavened. For indeed Christ, our Passover, was sacrificed for us.”

Children’s Bible Program – Level 2: Lesson 21 “The Holy Days Picture God’s Plan”

Read Together: Before God created the universe, He planned to create human beings and make them a part of His family. He determined to give mankind the gift of free moral agency. In other words, He would give mankind the ability to make choices. The most important decision is choosing whether to obey God or not. But God recognized that under the influence of Satan, man would choose to follow his own heart and disobey His commands. And just as Satan had done, Adam and Eve rebelled against Him. Since then, all humanity has followed their example. But God is holy and wants nothing to do with sin. So, how could sinful mankind ever become a part of God’s holy family? The answer is amazing! Remember, God had an astonishing plan for the human race to be part of His spirit family, and He wants us to know about it. To help us understand each step in His master plan, He gave us the Holy Days. This is why we observe these days every year, beginning with the Passover. Learning about the Passover helps us to understand the first step in God’s plan for us – and all people who have ever lived.

Read Together:  1 Peter 1:1820; 1 Corinthians 15:2122; Romans 3:23; Psalm 5:4; Isaiah 59:2; Leviticus 23:137

Discuss:

  • Remind your child that it was God’s plan from the beginning to create a family. We are made in His image (Genesis 1:2627), and we should grow in character to become like Christ (Ephesians 4:1315).
  • Discuss with your child what it means to have free moral agency. Mankind has not been given the right to decide what is right and wrong. Only God has the wisdom to make that determination. We  choose whether or not we will do what is right as God defines it.
  • Help your child identify each of the Festivals and Holy Days mentioned in Leviticus 23. Briefly discuss how each Holy Day fits into God’s plan. Be sure to emphasize Leviticus 23:2 where God says, “… these are My feasts.”
  • Help your child understand that they are a part of God’s plan and that God is looking forward to them being born into His family.

Review Memorization:

1 Corinthians 5:7 “Therefore purge out the old leaven, that you may be a new lump, since you truly are unleavened.   For indeed Christ, our Passover, was sacrificed for us.”

Children’s Bible Program – Level 2: Lesson 20 “Isaac Inherits the Promises”

Richard Gunther, Gunther.net.nz
| FreeBibleImages.org

By Janth English and LivingEd Staff

Read Together: Sarah died in Hebron at the age of 137 years old. God had allowed her to watch her son grow into a man. Shortly after Sarah died, Abraham sent his servant back to his own country to find a wife for Isaac. When the servant arrived at the well outside the city of Nahor, a young woman named Rebekah came to draw water. The servant had prayed asking that the young woman who gave him water to drink and offered to water his camels would be the one chosen to be Isaac’s wife. Rebekah did exactly that. The servant found out that Rebekah was the granddaughter of Abraham’s brother Nahor. Rebekah agreed to leave her family, go to Canaan, and marry a man she had never met. Isaac was forty years old when he and Rebekah were married. Abraham died at 175 years of age and lived to see the birth of Isaac’s sons. This was further evidence that God’s promise of giving Abraham many descendants would be fulfilled. After Abraham died, God spoke to Isaac and made the same promises to him that He had made to Abraham. God said that He would give all the land of Canaan to Isaac’s descendants, and that they would be as numerous as the stars in heaven. God promised that in Isaac’s seed, all the nations would be blessed.

Read Together:  Genesis 23-26 (select portions according to your child’s comprehension level. This could be done over several days.)

Discuss:

  • Point out to your child that Abraham had seven other sons who are named in the Scriptures – Ishmael (from Hagar), and Zimran, Jokshan, Medan, Midian, Ishbak, and Shuah (from Keturah).  However, Isaac was the son of promise.
  • Discuss with your son or daughter the qualities the servant was looking for in a wife for Isaac by seeing if she would give him water and offer to water his camels.
  • Talk to your child about the blessing Rebekah’s family gave her. How does her blessing relate to the promises God gave to Abraham and his descendants?
  • Ask your child how they think Isaac may have felt when God appeared to him personally. Would that be very encouraging for Isaac?

Review Memorization:

Hebrews 11:17–18  “By faith Abraham, when he was tested, offered up Isaac, and he who had received the promises offered up his only begotten son, of whom it was said, ‘In Isaac your seed shall be called,’ concluding that God was able to raise him up, even from the dead, from which he also received him in a figurative sense.”

Children’s Bible Program – Level 2: Lesson 19 “Abraham and Isaac Are Tested”

www.Lambsongs.co.nz | FreeBibleImages.org

By Janth English

Read Together:  Abraham and Sarah watched and guided Isaac as he grew into a young man. Abraham taught Isaac about God and told him about the promises He had made. Then, when Isaac was still a young man, God told Abraham to take him to the land of Moriah and offer him as a sacrifice! After hearing God’s instruction, Abraham dutifully arose the next morning, prepared for the journey, and headed toward the mountain with Isaac and two of his servants. It took them three days to reach the place where Isaac was to be offered. One can only imagine how difficult this journey was for Abraham. Nevertheless, He was willing to obey God’s command. Remember, God had promised that He would give many descendants to Abraham, and Isaac was the son who was miraculously born to Abraham and Sarah to bring about that promise. He knew that God was able to raise Isaac from the dead, if necessary, to keep His promise. Abraham and Isaac went up to the top of the mountain where Isaac allowed himself to be bound. Then Abraham laid his son on the wood of the altar to become the offering. Abraham raised the knife to slay his son when God stopped him. God then knew without any doubt that Abraham feared Him, trusted Him and loved Him more than anything or anyone – even his own son. God blessed Abraham for his faith and obedience and gave him even greater promises than before! God told him that all the people on earth would be blessed because of Abraham’s obedience!

Read Together:  Genesis 18:17–19; 22:1–18; Hebrews 11:17–19

Discuss:

  • Point out some great examples in the Bible of young people seeking God’s will and obeying Him. Isaac is one of them. Who else can you remember?
  • Discuss with your child some examples in Abraham’s life that validate why he is called the father of the faithful (Romans 4:16).
  • Help your child think about how difficult it would be to sacrifice your child or to be the person who is sacrificed. Ask them to imagine what it would have been like to be Isaac. Isaac could have run away, but instead he followed his father’s instruction, just as Abraham was following God’s instruction. This would have taken great courage and faith on the part of Isaac toward his father!
  • Explain to your child how Abraham and Isaac pictured the Father and Jesus Christ during their test. Abraham was a type of the Father who offered His Son, and Isaac pictured Christ, who willingly laid down His life (John 10:17–18).

Review Memorization:

Hebrews 11:17–18 “By faith Abraham, when he was tested, offered up Isaac, and he who had received the promises offered up his only begotten son, of whom it was said, ‘In Isaac your seed shall be called,’ concluding that God was able to raise him up, even from the dead, from which he also received him in a figurative sense.”

Children’s Bible Program – Level 2: Lesson 18 “God’s Promises to Abraham”

Sweet Publishing | FreeBibleImages.org

Read Together: God promised to make Abram a great nation, saying that all the nations of the earth would be blessed through him. God showed Abram all the land of Canaan and promised it to his descendants. Abram had traveled throughout the land of Canaan for 24 years, and now he was 99 years old. God had promised that his descendants would be as numerous as the sand on the seashore, but he still did not have a son. It was at this time that God appeared to Abram and expanded the promises. He told Abram that he was going to make him a father of many nations and that some of his descendants would be kings. God changed Abram’s name to Abraham and his wife’s name, Sarai, to Sarah, to reflect the promise that many nations would come from them. God told Abraham that he and Sarah would have a son the next year, and they were to call him Isaac, which means laughter. Perhaps Isaac was given that name because both Abraham and Sarah laughed when they first heard they would have a son. The next year Isaac was born, just as God had said. Isaac was the beginning of the fulfillment of God’s promises to Abraham.

Read Together:  Genesis 13:14–18; 15:1–6, 18–21; 17:1–24; 18:1–15; 21:1–6

Discuss:

  • Discuss with your child how Abraham remained faithful to God year after year, believing that God’s promises would be fulfilled through his descendants. Include Hebrews 11:1 in the discussion. Remind your son or daughter that if God says something, it is as good as done!
  • Ask your child if they can remember some of the promises God gave to Abraham. Discuss with them how these promises have been fulfilled (e.g. through Jesus Christ, European kingdoms, Great Britain, and the United States).
  • Remind your child that the promises were also made to Sarah. She was an important part of the covenant God made with Abraham. God loves both men and women.  All human beings are created in His image (Genesis 1:27).
  • God names things what they are. From the Bible, we learn that in the Kingdom we will all to be given a new name. Ask your child what name he or she would choose for themselves to reflect their character and personality.

Review Memorization:  Hebrews 11:17–18  “By faith Abraham, when he was tested, offered up Isaac, and he who had received the promises offered up his only begotten son, of whom it was said, ‘In Isaac your seed shall be called,’ concluding that God was able to raise him up, even from the dead, from which he also received him in a figurative sense.”

Printable PDF – L2.18

Children’s Bible Program – Level 2: Lesson 17 “Abram Leaves for Canaan”

Sweet Publishing | FreeBibleImages.org

By Janth English

Read Together:  Abram was born 292 years after the flood. His family lived in a city called “Ur”, which was in the area of modern-day Iraq.  He was the youngest son of his father Terah whose ancestor was Shem. Abram married his half-sister Sarai, but they did not have any children. Terah left Ur for Canaan and took Abram, Sarai, and Lot, his grandson, with him.  The family stopped for a while in Haran where Terah died. Abram had become very wealthy in Haran. By the time he was 75 years old, he owned livestock, and had silver, gold, and many servants. This would surely have made it hard to leave Haran. But God commanded Abram to leave his home and go to a distant land that He would show him. In return for his obedience, God promised to make Abram’s descendants a great nation. Amazingly, Abram immediately obeyed God. He simply took his wife, his nephew Lot, and all their possessions and left his home for good.

Read Together: Gen. 11:24-32; 12:1-10; 13:2-4

Discuss:

  • Explain to your child that it was not uncommon for people to marry close relatives in Abraham’s days.  Remind him/her that everyone was closely related after the flood because only one family survived. God later commanded the Israelites not to marry close relatives (Lev. 18:6-17).
  • Discuss with your son or daughter how difficult it must have been for Abram and Sarai to pack up and move to a place that they did not know.  There were no trucks or vans to move them and no hotels along the way. Ask your student what might have been some of the hardships Abram and Sarai could anticipate on their journey.
  • Abram must have known how hard his journey would be. Still, he did not argue with God. He just obeyed what God told him to do. Talk with your child about Abram’s character. Highlight the good example that Abram showed when he obeyed God immediately.
  • God promised Abram that he would become a great nation, but that promise was not fulfilled right away.  Explain to your student that obedience to God must come first before we receive any rewards.

 Review Memorization:

Heb 11:8 NKJV “By faith Abraham obeyed when he was called to go out to the place which he would receive as an inheritance. And he went out, not knowing where he was going.”

Printable PDF – L2.17

Children’s Bible Program – Level 2: Lesson 16 “Nimrod’s Legacy”

Sweet Publishing | FreeBibleImages.org

By Janth English

Read Together: The Bible portrays Nimrod as an evil man, and we still see the effect of his evil influence today. Nimrod is the first recorded leader to organize people into city-states so that he could rule over them. He was a proud tyrant who was openly rebellious toward God. Nimrod built the city of Babel, and led the effort to undermine God’s plan for people to spread throughout the earth, building a tower that reached to the sky. Many historians trace the pagan traditions that are part of all of the world’s religions today back to this very city. People who are really following God avoid these traditions, even if they are mixed with a worship of Christ. Instead, God’s people keep His Sabbath, Holy Days and other commands.

Read Together: Genesis 10:8–12; 11:5–9; Revelation 17:5; 18:1–2.

Discuss:

  • Ask your child what are some wrong traditions that people in the world’s churches observe?
  • Explain that many modern church traditions of the world started a long time ago. (You may wish to refer to the booklet, “Satan’s Counterfeit Christianity,” pp. 8–10, https://www.tomorrowsworld.org/booklets/satans-counterfeit-christianity).
  • Ask your child, who is really behind the false traditions and religious deception of the world? (Reference Revelation 12:9)
  • Explain to your child that the Bible shows that end-time religious deception (“Babylon”) is just a modern version of traditions started long ago (the city of “Babel”). (Reference Genesis 11:9 and Revelation 17:5; 18:1–2)
  • Explain to your child that we can only understand God’s truth because He opens our mind and helps us not be deceived (John 6:44, Matthew 13:11).
  • Ask your child what about God’s way of life are they most thankful for?

Review Memorization.

Genesis 11:9 “Therefore its name is called Babel, because there the LORD confused the language of all the earth; and from there the LORD scattered them abroad over the face of all the earth.”

Printable PDF – L2.16

Printable PDF – L2.13-L2.16

Children’s Bible Program – Level 2: Lesson 15 “The Tower of Babel”

Sweet Publishing | FreeBibleImages.org

By Janth English

Read Together: The city of Babel was the beginning of Nimrod’s empire, and the beginning of mankind’s post-Flood attempt to govern himself apart from God. Nimrod led the people to build a very tall tower in rebellion against Him. But God was not pleased with their actions, so God decided to confuse the people’s language. They couldn’t share ideas and so they weren’t able to keep working on the tower. The word “Babel” itself means confusion, and you can imagine what happened when God confused the languages. Only those who spoke the same language could understand each other, and God divided the languages along family lines. People stayed with those they could understand, and they began to settle in their own territories as God wanted them to. Needless to say, work on the tower ceased. The Tower of Babel was never completed, but the attitude of mankind’s rebellion against God continues to this day.

Read Together: Genesis 11:1–9

Discuss:

  • Ask what the people of Babel did to show their defiance toward God.
  • Ask your child to imagine working on a group assignment when suddenly he or she could not understand anything other members of the team were saying. Would they be able to work together as a team? This is the same situation that occurred in Babel when God confused the languages.
  • Point out to your child that God wants people to communicate and understand one another. This is why He will restore a pure language to mankind in the Millennium (Zephaniah 3:9).

Review Memorization.

Genesis 11:9 “Therefore its name is called Babel, because there the LORD confused the language of all the earth; and from there the LORD scattered them abroad over the face of all the earth.”

Printable PDF – L2.15