The Feast of Trumpets

Welcome to the Feast of Trumpets Focus Study! In this Focus Study, we will explore the historical observance and significance of this Holy Day. The Feast of Trumpets, one of God’s seven annual Holy Days, pictures a time of catastrophic and amazing events prophesied to happen at the end of the age. Students will take this opportunity to learn about the symbolism and usage of trumpets in the Bible, the meaning of each of the trumpet blasts in Revelation, and the subsequent events foretold to take place. At the seventh and final trumpet blast, Jesus Christ will return to the earth, overthrow Satan as ruler, and claim the title and role as the King of kings over all nations. With final the trumpet sound the announcement will be made, “The kingdoms of this world have become the kingdoms of our Lord and of His Christ, and He shall reign forever and ever” (Revelation 11:15). 

 This Focus Study will serve as a guide for students who would like to engage in an in-depth study on the Feast of Trumpets. The seven final trumpet blasts signify a time when God will establish the reign of Jesus Christ as supreme ruler over the earth. His resurrected saints will help govern and transform a devastated world, which will require much-needed healing and guidance, by teaching all nations the true way to peace through God’s perfect law of liberty. The Feast of trumpets reminds us to look forward to the sound of the last trump when the saints will be raised incorruptible and Satan will be dethroned, in preparation for the millennial reign of Christ, and the establishment of the Kingdom of God.


Introduction

The Symbolism

The Day of the Feast

The Prophetic Meaning

Conclusion

Paul’s Imprisonment

“You see, brother, how many myriads of Jews there are who have believed, and they are all zealous for the law; but they have been informed about you that you teach all the Jews who are among the Gentiles to forsake Moses, saying that they ought not to circumcise their children nor to walk according to the customs. What then? The assembly must certainly meet, for they will hear that you have come. Therefore do what we tell you: We have four men who have taken a vow. Take them and be purified with them, and pay their expenses so that they may shave their heads, and that all may know that those things of which they were informed concerning you are nothing, but that you yourself also walk orderly and keep the law. But concerning the Gentiles who believe, we have written and decided that they should observe no such thing, except that they should keep themselves from things offered to idols, from blood, from things strangled, and from sexual immorality” (Acts 21:20-25).

When the Apostle Paul and his traveling companions arrived in Jerusalem in 57 CE for Pentecost, with the gifts from the churches of Greece and Asia Minor, the brethren “welcomed them gladly” (Acts 21:17). The next day he and his companions met with James, the presiding apostle at Jerusalem, and the headquarters elders. The sense of it is that this was a private meeting. Paul gave a full report telling “in detail those things which God had done among the Gentiles through his ministry” (Acts 21:19). The response by James and all the elders as recorded in Acts 21:20-25 deserves some thoughtful analysis. Luke appears to have summarized various comments and advice into a single overall statement as follows:

Introduction

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Lecture

  1. Second Apostolic Tour
  2. Ancient Corinth
  3. Third Apostolic Tour
  4. Arrest at Jerusalem
  5. Herod Agrippa II

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Conclusion

Apostolic Tour

When the Apostle Paul and his traveling companions arrived in Jerusalem in 57 CE for Pentecost, with the gifts from the churches of Greece and Asia Minor, the brethren “welcomed them gladly” (Acts 21:17). The next day he and his companions met with James, the presiding apostle at Jerusalem, and the headquarters elders. The sense of it is that this was a private meeting. Paul gave a full report telling “in detail those things which God had done among the Gentiles through his ministry” (Acts 21:19). The response by James and all the elders as recorded in Acts 21:20-25 deserves some thoughtful analysis. Luke appears to have summarized various comments and advice into a single overall statement as follows:

“You see, brother, how many myriads of Jews there are who have believed, and they are all zealous for the law; but they have been informed about you that you teach all the Jews who are among the Gentiles to forsake Moses, saying that they ought not to circumcise their children nor to walk according to the customs. What then? The assembly must certainly meet, for they will hear that you have come. Therefore do what we tell you: We have four men who have taken a vow. Take them and be purified with them, and pay their expenses so that they may shave their heads, and that all may know that those things of which they were informed concerning you are nothing, but that you yourself also walk orderly and keep the law. But concerning the Gentiles who believe, we have written and decided that they should observe no such thing, except that they should keep themselves from things offered to idols, from blood, from things strangled, and from sexual immorality” (Acts 21:20-25).

Introduction

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Lecture

  1. Travels of Philip
  2. Saul’s Conversion
  3. First Apostolic Tour
  4. Apostolic Council

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Conclusion

The Church Begins

God gave the Holy Spirit to His Church on the Day of Pentecost in 31 CE. It had been an unforgettable 50 days for Christ’s disciples. Their Teacher had come back from the dead after a brutal execution, and had taught them for 40 days. More than 500 at one time had seen Him (1 Corinthians 15:6). The disciples ate with Him, talked with Him and even touched the wounds where His body had been pierced. But that was not all. After 40 dramatic days of instruction, the Savior ascended into the clouds, while His disciples watched with wonder and amazement. But He did not leave them alone—He promised to give them something that would empower them with spiritual vitality they had never before experienced (Luke 24:49).

Luke describes Christ’s encouraging words. “And being assembled together with them, He commanded them not to depart from Jerusalem, but to wait for the Promise of the Father, ‘which,’ He said, ‘you have heard from Me; for John truly baptized with water, but you shall be baptized with the Holy Spirit not many days from now’” (Acts 1:4–5). This momentous 50th day was the day of Pentecost—the day of miracles—the day the New Testament Church began! What happened on that amazing Day of Pentecost in 31 CE?

On the day of Pentecost Jesus’ followers were seated (Acts 2:2) in a building. The notion of them meeting in the “Upper Room” where Jesus instituted the Christian Passover is a myth. The Temple Court, a single structure about one quarter of a mile in circumference, was a massive complex with hundreds of rooms. The colonnade at the southern wall, known as the Royal Stoa or Solomon’s Portico, was its probable venue as it was open toward the Temple court. Its exposed access allowed for people in the Royal Stoa to be easily seen and heard from the outside the colonnade. The apostles then were immediately accessible to Jews and proselytes gathered for the festival.


Introduction

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Lectures

  1. The Great Commission
  2. Equipping the Disciples
  3. The Work of God Begins
  4. The Jews and Gentiles

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Conclusion

Passover to the Resurrection

Jesus ate His last Passover meal in the “Upper Room” with His followers (Mark 14:15; Luke 22:12). Throughout the Apostolic Age, the ancient Church of God celebrated this event from the perspective of the night of this Last Supper. The symbols of this New Passover consisted of unleavened bread and wine (symbolic of Jesus’ broken body and shed blood). Jesus introduced these New Covenant symbols at the beginning of Nisan 14, the Tuesday evening before His death. The first-century order of service at the New Passover included a foot-washing ceremony followed by the ritual partaking of unleavened bread and wine. Early Christians continued to keep the New Passover, annually, at the beginning of the fourteenth day of the first month, called Abib anciently and Nisan in Jesus’ day, determined by the priestly lunisolar calendar. We call it the New Passover or Christian Passover herein only to distinguish it from the Passover of the Jews, which was observed at the beginning of Nisan 15. The first Christians presumably simply referred to it as Passover. It’s important to note that the followers of Jesus kept the very first Christian Passover on a Tuesday evening, a full twenty-four hours before the traditional Jewish Passover on Wednesday night. The Christian Passover was set as an annual event, at the beginning of the fourteenth of Nisan, observed at the hour set by Jesus. It is vitally important that we understand the significance of the Passover.

Introduction

Resources

#1 – First Christian Passover

#2 – The Garden of Gethsemane

#3 – Arrested

#4 – The Crucifixion

#5 – The Resurrection

#6 – Post-Resurrection

Conclusion

The Judean Ministry

The gospel writer Matthew describes Jesus’ ministry in Galilee. What gospel did Jesus preach? “And Jesus went about all Galilee, teaching in their synagogues, preaching the gospel of the kingdom, and healing all kinds of sickness and all kinds of disease among the people” (Matthew 4:23). Later in the book of Matthew, we see that Jesus continued to preach the gospel of the kingdom! “Then Jesus went about all the cities and villages, teaching in their synagogues, preaching [what?] the gospel of the kingdom, and healing every sickness and every disease among the people” (Matthew 9:35).

So, we see the clear historical record of Jesus’ preaching the gospel, the gospel of the kingdom. The gospel writer Mark further describes the gospel this way: “Now after John was put in prison, Jesus came to Galilee, preaching the gospel of the kingdom of God, and saying, ‘The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand. Repent, and believe in the gospel’” (Mark 1:14-15).

Introduction

  Resources

#1 – The Sea of Galilee

#2 – Training of the Twelve

#3 – Galilee to Judea

#4 – The Feast at Jerusalem

#5 – Later Judean Ministry

#6 – Perean Ministry

#7 – Resurrection of Lazarus

#8 – Later Perean Ministry

#9 – Jerusalem Before Passover

#10 – Olivet Prophecy

#11 – Olivet Parables

Conclusion

The Galilean Ministry

At the beginning of His ministry, “Jesus came to Galilee, preaching the gospel of the kingdom of God, and saying, ‘The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand. Repent, and believe in the gospel’” (Mark 1:14–15). The word “kingdom” means government. Jesus was talking about the coming government of God over this earth. He commanded: “REPENT, and believe in the gospel!” To “repent” means to be so sorry that you are not only willing to quit, but to turn around and go the other way. Of course we must repent of SIN. But what is sin? God answers: “Sin is the transgression of the law” (1 John 3:4, KJV). So we must repent of disobeying God’s Government — of breaking His LAW! Again, notice Jesus’ own inspired words on the subject: “Do not think that I came to destroy the Law or the Prophets. I did not come to destroy but to fulfill” (Matthew 5:17). In other words, Jesus in His own life perfectly performed the spiritual intent and purpose of God’s law. Why did He do this? Let God answer!


Introduction

Resources

#1 – A New Gospel

#2 – Sabbath Controversies

#3 – The Twelve

#4 – Sermon on the Mount

#5 – Christ’s Reputation Grows

#6 – Public Rejection

#7 – Parables of the Kingdom

#8 – Opposition Builds

Conclusion

The Biblical Passover

The death of Jesus of Nazareth, the Lamb of God, occurred in the afternoon of the daylight portion of Wednesday, Nisan 14th. Christ kept the Passover with His disciples on the evening before, as He had commanded the Israelites approximately 1,500 years earlier. On Wednesday morning, a contingent of Roman soldiers escorted Jesus to Golgotha where they crucified Him about 9:00 a.m., on a hillock just opposite Jerusalem. He died on the cross about 3:00 p.m., bleeding to death after being pierced in the side by a soldier’s spear. As Christ breathed His last breath, across the valley, in the temple, the high priest was sacrificing Passover lambs, according to the custom of many, though not all, of the Jews during Christ’s time. As Wednesday, Passover day, the 14th of Nisan, drew to a close, this pivotal event set the stage for the next exciting step in God’s plan for mankind.

Introduction

#1 – The Old Testament Passover

#2 – The New Testament Passover

#3 – The Rise of the Counterfeits

#4 – The Passover Today

Conclusion