Posts

God’s Spring Festivals – Part 2: Feast of Unleavened Bread

Artist: James Mitchell – Kingston, Jamaica

The second festival on God’s Holy Day calendar

that immediately follows the Passover is the Feast of Unleavened Bread. This festival is also often called the Days of Unleavened Bread as it goes for seven days. Just like Passover, the Days of Unleavened Bread remind us of events that happened in the past. This festival reminds us of the events in Exodus, when God brought the Children of Israel out of Egypt, yet these special days are meant to teach us some important spiritual lessons as well. What does God want us to learn from this Feast of Unleavened Bread that will help prepare us to be in His family? Wait and see!


How it works:

This Study Guide is written for the purpose of helping parents teach their children vital Biblical topics in a focused, easy-to-follow format. Each section is not meant to be taught in one lesson, rather the topics are organized so parents can choose specific areas of focus and gear lessons toward the learning styles and ages of their children. Each topic is presented in a straightforward manner with accompanying verses for study. The main study should always come from the Scripture itself, while these lessons can act as a guide for reading passages from the Bible. Each lesson packet includes memory verses, questions for meaningful discussion, and activities (added at the end of the packet). Also, though some things may be labeled as Level 1, 2, or 3, the activities, questions, and scriptures for memorizing can be used to fit the needs and learning levels for children of all ages. Enjoy!


God’s Spring Festivals – Part 1: Passover

Artist: James Mitchell – Kingston, Jamaica

“And the Lord spoke to Moses, saying,

‘Speak to the children of Israel, and say to them: “The feasts of the Lord, which you shall proclaim to be holy convocations, these are My feasts.”’” (Leviticus 23:1-2). In that incredible moment, God announced that He wanted His people to keep His feasts and to keep them every single year! Through these special feasts, or holy days, He wanted to teach His people the wonderful and exciting plan He has for every human being that has ever lived! Each year, God’s feasts give us time to reflect on God’s plans while also giving us a reason to celebrate! God set up the feast calendar so the first feasts in His plan happen in the springtime. Like the season of spring where the flowers and trees begin to grow again after a long, cold winter, God knew it would be the perfect time to begin a perfect plan. 


How it works:

This Study Guide is written for the purpose of helping parents teach their children vital Biblical topics in a focused, easy-to-follow format. Each section is not meant to be taught in one lesson, rather the topics are organized so parents can choose specific areas of focus and gear lessons toward the learning styles and ages of their children. Each topic is presented in a straightforward manner with accompanying verses for study. The main study should always come from the Scripture itself, while these lessons can act as a guide for reading passages from the Bible. Each lesson packet includes memory verses, questions for meaningful discussion, and activities (added at the end of the packet). Also, though some things may be labeled as Level 1, 2, or 3, the activities, questions, and scriptures for memorizing can be used to fit the needs and learning levels for children of all ages. Enjoy!


Children’s Bible Program – Level 1: NT Lesson 14 “The Lost Sheep”

Featured Passage: Luke 15


Asset-21@2x

Wherever Jesus went, people of all kinds followed Him to hear Him speak and to see His miracles. Many of them were poor or sick, but there were others who were rich and important – they all wanted to hear what Jesus had to say. One day, a group of tax collectors and sinners came to hear Him. The Jewish leaders were upset. They didn’t want Jesus to spend time teaching those kinds of people. They thought it was a waste of time. Then Jesus told them a story – it was a parable. He was explaining why He chose to teach and help the people who mostly everyone else didn’t seem to like.

Asset-22@2x

Discuss:

  1. What is a parable? (If you have a dictionary, look up the word, or you can go to dictionary.com online to find the meaning)
  2. Who does the shepherd in Jesus’ story about the lost sheep represent?
  3. What happens to the sheep in the parable? 
  4. Why do you think Jesus told this parable to the Jewish leaders? 
  5. How does God feel about all the people in the world? How does God feel when someone repents?
  6. What are some ways we can show love to other people? What about people who don’t understand God’s way?
Asset-23@2x

Memory Challenge:

Mark 16:15-18

Luke 15:7 

“I say to you that likewise there will be more joy in heaven over one sinner who repents than over ninety-nine just persons who need no repentance.”


Digging Deeper: Daughter of Abraham

Author: Mr. Kenneth Frank | Faculty in Theology, Living Education


Estimated Reading time: 7 min. 48 sec.

Did you know that Jesus illustrated acceptable Sabbath behavior by healing a crippled woman on the Sabbath?

When referring to her, He used a term that appears only once in our entire Bible: “daughter of Abraham.” This was a striking term for its focus on women. “Son of Abraham” appears twice in our New Testament. The Gospel According to Luke alone described this incident. Luke paid special attention to stories involving women as they related to Jesus’ ministry, even more so than the other Gospels. This Digging Deeper will examine this account of the daughter of Abraham, providing a vital lesson concerning acceptable Sabbath behavior.

Our focus verse is: “And ought not this woman, being a daughter of Abraham, whom Satan hath bound, lo, these eighteen years, be loosed from this bond on the sabbath day?” (Luke 13:16 KJV). So special was this story to Luke that he focused attention on how women were often treated, or mistreated, in first-century Judaism. This anecdote is often referred to as “The Healing of the Crippled Woman” or “A Woman with a Disabling Spirit.” Its context is Luke 13:10-17.

Jesus performs a miracle

This is the only recorded case of Christ’s preaching in a synagogue during the latter part of his ministry. It was customary to invite visiting rabbis, like Jesus, to deliver the sermon after the reading of the Law and the Prophets from the biblical scrolls. Please refer to my recent Digging Deeper article, “What Was Moses’ Seat?” While Jesus was preaching, He noticed a woman bowed over who could not lift up herself. The word in v. 11 for “bowed” in Greek is a medical term (Luke was a physician – Colossians 4:14) indicating curvature of the spine as if she were doubled over from carrying a heavy burden. Upon seeing her, Jesus immediately set her free from her infirmity by laying hands on her to straighten her (vv. 12-13). He would not heal her from a distance, as He did in other cases. The touch of the Master’s hand gave her the encouragement needed to stand up straight. Once she did, she broke out into praise to God (v. 13).

Surprisingly, the ruler of the synagogue, who also should have rejoiced, criticized Jesus’ action because He had healed her on the Sabbath (v. 14). According to rabbinical tradition, emergency cases might be given a minimum of attention on the Sabbath, but not chronic cases such as hers. Perhaps this daughter of Abraham had been attending this particular synagogue for the entire 18 years of her infirmity. As a result, her case would not be classified as urgent. Either no one was able to help her, or perhaps, even tried. Nonetheless, she continued faithfully attending Sabbath services. This crippled woman had hobbled to synagogue every Sabbath for these 18 years! If she had not attended that day, she may never have been healed. Her example is an encouragement to all women that, despite pain and suffering, they go where there will be reassurance, fellowship, and even blessing among other worshipers on God’s day.

An unwelcome response

Notice that in v. 14, this ruler angrily turned to the audience to complain that Jesus had healed her on the Sabbath. Perhaps this was his pious attempt to discredit Jesus so he could retain control over this congregation. He considered healing a type of work forbidden on the Sabbath (v. 14). Jesus retorted that the Law permitted properly feeding and watering one’s animals on the Sabbath (v. 15). Then Jesus asked a pointed question in v. 16: should not this poor woman be loosed from this bond on the Sabbath if farmers and ranchers commonly served their livestock on the Sabbath? A.T. Robertson in his Word Pictures in the New Testament explains Jesus’ reason for healing her as a “Triple argument, human being and not an ox or ass, woman, daughter of Abraham (Jewess), besides being old and ill” (e-Sword 12.2).

Verse 17 displays contrasting responses to her healing: the audience rejoiced while Jesus’ adversaries were ashamed. This was a culture of honor and shame. The synagogue ruler had tried to shame Jesus in public but Jesus turned the tables on him by working a breathtaking miracle in front of them all. These critics of her healing were shamed before their congregation, displaying their unreasonable standards of Sabbath observance.

A woman of the covenant

At the beginning of v. 16, Jesus referred to her as a “daughter of Abraham.” This was deliberate because the term “son of Abraham” was used commonly to stress the worth of men as members of the covenant community. However, the title “daughter of Abraham” was virtually unknown because women were not seen as citizens of the nation but rather as members of their family. Jesus used this exalted title to stress that she was a woman in the covenant community – God’s highly favored elect people – since she was a descendent of the great patriarch, Abraham. Attending synagogue, despite her 18 years of suffering, indicates she was not just a Jewess but a believer in the God of Abraham who had made a covenant with her people. She was entitled to the Messiah’s blessing.   

Many Jews regarded women as less important than men. Notice Jesus’ contrasting treatment of women, as explained by The Preacher’s Complete Homiletical Commentary, edited by Joseph S. Exell: “There is great beauty in the behaviour of Christ to women, whether it be the woman of Samaria, whose deep wound He probes so faithfully, yet with so light a touch; or the child of Jairus, to whom He speaks in her own dialect, holding her hand; or the widow of Nain, whom He bids not to weep; or she whose many sins were forgiven her, loving much; or Mary, for whose lavish gift He found so pathetic [touching] an apology—’She hath done it unto My burial’” (e-Sword 12.2).   

A lesson in loosing burdens

The word “loosed” in v. 16 is used for disease only here in our New Testament, evidently because it referred to being bound by the Devil. Jesus argued from the lesser to the greater. How much more important was a human condition of suffering compared to an animal’s. Both should be considered acts of mercy permitted on God’s holy day. Jesus was “Lord of the Sabbath” (Mark 2:28) and therefore knew how the day should be observed.  Jesus’ critics did not accept Him as the God of the Hebrew Scriptures who created the Sabbath.

A common belief in Jewish culture was that calamity or suffering was the result of some great sin. No sin is connected to her suffering. Instead, Jesus said that Satan had bound this woman. No reason is given why Satan had done so. She was not possessed by the Devil; however, God permitted it as He had permitted Satan’s afflicting the patriarch Job. David Guzik in his Enduring Word Commentary explains this case had a spiritual dynamic: “We are foolish to think that spiritual issues cause all physical problems, but we [are] just as foolish to think spiritual issues can never cause physical problems” (e-Sword 12.2). For Jesus, handicaps were opportunities for God to display his power. Jesus displayed complete mastery during His ministry over demons, sickness, and disease.

What better day could there have been for this miracle than God’s Sabbath? Sabbath observance is not intended as a ritualistic burden, but as a blessing, as Jesus explained: “The sabbath was made for man, and not man for the sabbath” (Mark 2:27). Some Sabbath-keepers become so legalistic in their observance of the day that they forget the original intent was to provide rest, rejoicing, refreshment, and renewal for humans and animals during this holy time. It should be enjoyed for its created purpose, not as an excuse for gaining more profit or participating in trivial worldly pleasures.

Bob Utley’s You Can Understand the Bible teaches us a valuable lesson from this singular story: “Jesus exposed this man and all who think like him (plural, hypocrites). The rabbis had great compassion in their oral traditions for the human treatment of animals on the Sabbath (cf. Luke 14:5), but were restrictive in their treatment of humans. Jesus illustrates the fallacy of the rabbinical system’s legalism without compassion for people. We must be careful of our rules. They often become more important than people. People are priority with God. Only people are eternal. God made creation for fellowship with people! Our rules often say more about us than about God” (e-Sword 12.2)!


Ken Frank

Kenneth Frank was born and raised in New Jersey, USA and attended Ambassador College, graduating in 1973. He served in the Canadian ministry from 1973-1999, after which he returned to the USA to pastor churches in Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina for 15 years. Having earned a BA degree from Ambassador College he later earned a MA degree from Grand Canyon University before being assigned to the Charlotte office to teach at Living University, now Living Education. Currently, he teaches the Survey of the Bible course to the on-campus students and writes the Digging Deeper column for our online Bible study program. He is married, has four children, and seven grandchildren.

Course Spotlight: Why Did Peter Deny Christ?

In some of our online courses, we have a “Student Thoughts” section where we ask a question to see what the students think. In Unit 4 of the Life Ministry and Teachings of Jesus Christ course, we asked the question:

Why did Peter deny Christ (Luke 22:54-62)? What can we do in our own lives to make sure we do not deny Him (Matthew 10:32-33)?

Come take a look at some of the Student Responses below!


“Peter denied Christ three times because he feared. Scriptures tell us to be of courage and have faith. Christ also told us to pray not to be lead into temptation. If we are truly converted and do not deny Christ, He will not deny us to the Father. We must truly be sure we know the truth, love the truth, live the truth, and be willing to die for it if necessary.”

– SJ

“We have often been admonished to overcome self, Satan, and society. This incident with Peter is a good example of these three pulls in our lives. First, Peter was fearful of what society would do to him. The scripture reference of Matthew 10:32-33 is in the context of Jesus’ instructions to His disciples before sending them out. The preceding verses instructed them not to fear those who can kill the body but not the inward man that God has started within us. Peter’s focus on what the governing authorities could do was part of his failure here. Another vital part was that Satan was ‘playing him like a cheap fiddle.’ Jesus predicted Peter’s denial just a little earlier saying, ‘Simon, Simon! Indeed, Satan has asked for you, that he may sift you as wheat.’ (Luke 22:31) However, Satan’s influence over Peter’s actions here was because Peter was trusting in his own strength. This is evidenced by his use of the sword. In order for us to succeed in the job God has given us to do, we need to recognize our enemies. We have three. They are self, Satan, and society”

– TW

“Peter was still carnal, not fully conquered by the power of God, the Holy Spirit. Also, Peter was relying on his strength rather than putting his trust in God to take care of everything. So, for us today, we have to keep the commandments of God as shown in John 14:15. Also in 1 Thessalonians 5:18-22, we are told, ‘give thanks in all circumstances; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you. Do not quench the Spirit. Do not despise prophecies, but test everything; hold fast what is good. Abstain from every form of evil.’ [ESV] “

– LK

Forum Summary: Understanding Ourselves and Others

Author: Juliette McNair | Student, Living Education 2021


Estimated Reading Time: 3 minutes, 43 seconds.

Mr. Bob Rodzaj joined the Living Education students and staff from wintry Racine, Wisconsin via Webex. As he spoke, snow was falling, adding to the 2 feet already on the ground. Mr. Rodzaj grew up in Rochester, New York. He was introduced to the Church while he was studying architecture at Virginia Tech. After graduating with his bachelor’s degree, Mr. Rodzaj attended Ambassador College. He was ordained into the ministry over 30 years ago and currently pastors five congregations in Wisconsin, Illinois, and Iowa.

Mr. Rodzaj said, “Many years ago, I remember Dr. Meredith telling us to become students of human nature—why people do what they do, what makes them the way they are… I’d like to talk about that very subject: the need to better understand ourselves and others.”

“You bring with you what makes you—you.”

As a latchkey child, Mr. Rodzaj grew up with both his parents working full time. Outside of school, he was essentially alone. “By the time God called me at age 21, I was a deeply troubled, angry young man with a lot to overcome… But God helped me grow past the past.” Mr. Rodzaj said, “I speak to you at the beginning of your adult lives.” He asked the students how well they understood what they want out of life, why they want it, what’s important to them at the very core of their being—and how their past has shaped them. Mr. Rodzaj explained, “As a pastor, I’ve dealt with people who struggle with the effects of their past—particularly their formative years.” If people could understand themselves and others, they would improve the quality of their relationships and develop the ability to make a real difference in the lives of others now and in the millennium.

“The story of Job is the story of each one of us…”

Job thought he understood himself and God. He did what was right and thought he understood what God expected of him. Yet, Mr. Rodzaj explained, “Job’s relationship with God was based on fear.” Job said, after God allowed Satan to persecute him, “For the thing I greatly feared has come upon me” (Job 3:25). Job was motivated by terror: “He is unique, and who can make Him change… Therefore I am terrified at His presence” (Job 23:13-16). Mr. Rodzaj asked, “Does this describe a trusting relationship? Is this the kind of relationship God wants us to have with Him?” Eventually, Elihu told Job, “For has anyone said to God… ‘Teach me what I do not see…’?” (Job 34:31-32). Job hadn’t asked God for this understanding. Mr. Rodzaj explained that Job hadn’t understood what motivated him and the relationship that God expected of him. But Job came to understand himself and God correctly.

Do we understand our motives?

Mr. Rodzaj gave other examples in the Bible of individuals who needed to better understand themselves. One was the rich young man of Matthew 19:16-22. Mr. Rodzaj compared him to a young person in the Church. “The young man was very diligent, but there was something buried deep in his heart that he couldn’t see. Christ pierced right through to the core of the young man’s desire and ambition.” When Christ told him to go and sell all that he had, “he wasn’t willing to go there. But sooner or later, he would have to if he really wanted to inherit eternal life.” Mr. Rodzaj mentioned other individuals who needed to understand themselves. Adam and Eve didn’t understand their gullibility. Moses struggled with his fierce anger. And even Peter had to reckon with a cowardly side.

God Can Help

“People’s tendencies have an impact on their well-being and the well-being of others. It affects how we function, how we deal with life, and how we deal with others.” Mr. Rodzaj admitted that when he was the students’ age, he hadn’t understood himself. “I wish I had understood these things sooner. It would have made a world of difference—in my life, in my marriage, in my parenting, in my role as a minister and member, as an employee, as a boss, and as a friend.” Understanding yourself helps you to better understand others. But only God can search a Christian’s heart and mind (Jeremiah 17:10). God can help if we take Elihu’s advice and ask Him to “teach me what I do not see” (Job 34:32). Mr. Rodzaj concluded, “My hope and prayer is that you can learn this sooner and enjoy its fruit in your life and in all your relationships.”


This post is part of our new series of student-written content for LivingEd-Charlotte. These summaries cover topics originally presented by our faculty and guest speakers in our weekly Forum and Assembly. For more Assembly-related content check out our Second Thoughts posts.

Digging Deeper: What was Moses’ Seat?

Author: Mr. Kenneth Frank | Faculty in Theology, Living Education


Estimated Reading time: 7 min.

Did you know that Moses was honored with a seat in New Testament Jewish synagogues?

Centuries after Moses died, the seat of Moses was an honored chair in these meeting houses. In the first century, there is evidence from some synagogues of a special decorative seat called the “Seat of Moses” on a raised platform. His seat was filled by men who claimed the exalted position of teaching by Moses’ authority. Jesus referred to this religious office with some sharp statements about the religious leaders who occupied it. Today’s Digging Deeper explores the history behind this exalted position with Jesus’ important caveat.

Our central passage for this study is: “Then spake Jesus to the multitude, and to his disciples, Saying, The scribes and the Pharisees sit in Moses’ seat: All therefore whatsoever they bid you observe, that observe and do; but do not ye after their works: for they say, and do not” (Matthew 23:1-3 KJV). In this same chapter, Jesus pronounced seven woes upon these men for their abuse of power (Matthew 23:13-36).

The authority of Moses

Moses was the great legislator of the Israelite nation. God inspired him to preach and to inscribe five books (the Torah or Pentateuch) in God’s name. His influence transcended the centuries, for he is named 80 times in our New Testament, having a massive presence among the devout of the land. Moses occupied the office of expounder and chief justice for the application of the law to specific cases of conduct. Exodus 18 describes how his father-in-law convinced him to delegate authority to other judges under his command, thereby sharing his authority but leaving him as the chief justice with God’s final authority. Upon his death, Moses’ authority passed on to his successors who sat in his seat.

The Expository Notes of Dr. Constable explains what sitting in Moses’ seat represented: “According to Old Testament figurative usage a person who sat on a predecessor’s seat was that person’s successor (Exodus 11:5; 12:29; 1 Kings 1:35; 1:46; 2:12; 16:11; 2 Kings 15:12; Psalm 132:12)” (e-Sword 12.2). Adam Clarke’s Commentary on the Bible explains why God permitted them to do so: “They sat there formerly by Divine appointment: they sit there now by Divine permission” (Ibid.). They were not authorized to mandate new law but rather to interpret already provided law for their followers.

The College Press Bible Study Textbook Series describes how his position was transferred upon his death: “Moses’ seat is his cathedra, his ‘Bible Chair’ from which his doctrine is read and expounded. In Malachi’s day it was the priests who had the magisterial responsibility (Malachi 2:7 ff.), a duty as old as the priesthood itself (Leviticus 10:17; Deuteronomy 17:9-13). But with ‘Ezra the priest and scribe’ (Nehemiah 12:26) the function began shifting onto professional scribes (Nehemiah 8:4, 7-9; 8:13, 18; cf. Ezra 7:1-6; 10)” (e-Sword 12.2).

The Transfer of Influence

In the first century, the Levites were to have been Israel’s teachers, but most of them were Sadducees and no longer carried the same authority. Moses’ authority had devolved to the scribes and Pharisees. Study of the Scriptures was of little interest to the indifferent Sadducees. The Pulpit Commentary, edited by H.D.M. Spence and Joseph S. Exell, explains: “The Sadducees seem to have had no popular influence, and were never recognized as leaders. The Levitical priests never appear in the Gospels as teachers or expositors of the Mosaic system; this function of theirs had devolved upon scribes and lawyers” (e-Sword 12.2).

By Jesus’ day, scribes (doctors of the law or legal experts) were mostly from the Pharisaic party instead of the Sadducean, but not all Pharisees were scribes. Dr. Bob Utley’s You Can Understand the Bible describes the scribes as “…experts in the Written Law (OT) and the Oral Law (Talmud) of Israel and were available to make local practical applications. In effect they replaced the traditional OT functions of the local Levites” (e-Sword 12.2). A Commentary on the Holy Bible, edited by J.R. Dummelow explains their claim to authority: “The scribes (who were ordained with the laying-on of hands) claimed to have received their authority through an unbroken succession from Moses. The ‘sitting’ refers to the judicial power, and the authority to teach, which all scribes or rabbis possessed, and which was centred in the Great Sanhedrin [Jewish supreme court]” (Ibid.).

Sitting to Teach

Moses’ writings were read incrementally in the synagogues every Sabbath day (Acts 15:21). When the Law of Moses (Genesis-Deuteronomy) and the Prophets were read from the scrolls stored in “the Ark” (cabinet) in synagogues, the reader stood; however, when he expounded the reading afterward he sat. Sitting was the posture of a teacher. Jesus employed this position to teach as well: “And seeing the multitudes, he went up into a mountain: and when he was set, his disciples came unto him” (Matthew 5:1 KJV). The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges notes that “In the Talmud ‘to sit’ is nearly synonymous with ‘to teach'” (e-Sword 12.2).

When Jesus said the scribes and the Pharisees sit on Moses’ seat, He merely acknowledged the fact. The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges explains His remark about these leaders: “Where they went wrong Jesus will point out. But here He must mention them, because, despite their faults, they uphold Moses, as opposed to the paganizing leadership of the Sadducean priesthood” (e-Sword 12.2).

However, Jesus did criticize their hypocrisy (Matthew 23:3-7). The College Press Bible Study Textbook Series clarifies that Jesus’ criticism of these religious leaders was not for their holding such an authoritative position but “…because their party zeal strenuously applied the theologians’ legalistic conclusions to everyday life with a rigor that required everyone to fall in lock-step behind them. In this sense, the Pharisees, too, were Israel’s teachers, even if unofficially” (e-Sword 12.2).

To do what they say

In Matthew 23:3 Jesus does not dispute the importance of Moses’ law, but His implication is clear. He goes on to explain that these teachers did not obey their teachings (Matthew 23:4). As The College Press Bible Study Textbook Series continues ” … whatever comes from Moses is from God and is to be received with full confidence and submission. Merely because Jesus must undercut the unjustified pretensions of the Jewish magisterium does not mean that Moses must go too. So, before beginning His condemnation of the unfaithfulness and sinful conduct of the religious leaders, He calls for sincere reverence for God’s Law” (e-Sword 12.2).

Matthew Henry’s Commentary on the Whole Bible provides us two important lessons from this passage:

“1. Many a good place is filled with bad men; it is no new thing for the vilest men to be exalted even to Moses’s seat (Psalm 12:8); and, when it is so, the men are not so much honoured by the seat as the seat is dishonoured by the men. Now they that sat in Moses’s seat were so wretchedly degenerated, that it was time for the great Prophet to arise, like unto Moses, to erect another seat.

2. Good and useful offices and powers are not therefore to be condemned and abolished, because they fall sometimes into the hands of bad men, who abuse them. We must not therefore pull down Moses’s seat, because scribes and Pharisees have got possession of it; rather than so, let both grow together until the harvest, Matthew 13:30″ (e-Sword 12.2).

Respect for high office, especially religious office, is a fundamental teaching of church government. Jesus set the record straight at a time when there was much abuse of this position by the religious teachers. This was not meant to condone their unbiblical behavior but rather to instruct their followers to abide by their correct teachings of God’s word, despite their hypocrisy. God’s mighty word will still change lives, even if delivered by defective servants.


Ken Frank

Kenneth Frank was born and raised in New Jersey, USA and attended Ambassador College, graduating in 1973. He served in the Canadian ministry from 1973-1999, after which he returned to the USA to pastor churches in Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina for 15 years. Having earned a BA degree from Ambassador College he later earned a MA degree from Grand Canyon University before being assigned to the Charlotte office to teach at Living University, now Living Education. Currently, he teaches the Survey of the Bible course to the on-campus students and writes the Digging Deeper column for our online Bible study program. He is married, has four children, and seven grandchildren.

Student Life: A Ladies Weekend

Author: Juliette McNair | Student, Living Education Charlotte 2021


On February 13, at 1:00 p.m., Mrs. Christy McNair, Mrs. Carol Weston, Miss Rebekah Ross, and the female Living Ed students joined the Walterboro congregation for services. Later that evening, after an adventure of several wrong turns, U-turns, and GPS malfunctions, they happily arrived at their booked Airbnb outside the Historic District of Charleston, South Carolina.

The ladies spent a rainy Sunday morning on a “Charleston’s Alleys & Hidden Passages” tour. They followed their guide through romantic city alleys sandwiched between historic brick pubs, meeting houses, and homes. Magnolias, ferns, and camellias sprawled in the tiny spaces around intricately wrought iron gates, red brick walls, and cobblestone pathways. They walked “Rainbow Road,” where old merchant buildings that originally stood on the riverfront were restored in the 1900s into today’s most-photographed section of Charleston. The ladies stood on the Battery promenade—a civil war defensive artillery site—where the Ashley and Cooper rivers pour into the Charleston Harbor. Through the rain, they could just glimpse Fort Sumter, Fort Johnson, and Fort Sullivan across the water.

That afternoon, they walked and shopped the Charleston City Market, only slightly chilled by the cold rain. The girls warmed up that evening with cups of hot chocolate and cheerful conversation They asked Mrs. Weston and Mrs. McNair about their experiences and shared their own. The next day, they rounded off the trip by visiting the Charleston Tea Garden Angel Oak, a huge 1400-year-old southern live oak.

When asked what she enjoyed most about the Charleston weekend, Meredith Hodges replied, “I really enjoyed the car ride. Getting to know Mrs. Weston was really fun… Also, the tour—all those little alleys and plants were really cool. And dancing in the rain.”

The ladies drove back to Charlotte in more stormy weather—but not even a little rain could dampen their fun this weekend.


Juliette McNair is a student at Living Education Charlotte. She works in the Editorial Department transcribing sermons and proofreading transcripts. She also assists Living Education by writing Second Thoughts essays and Forum/Assembly Summaries for the website. Juliette recently graduated from SUNY Cobleskill in Upstate New York with an A.A.S in Horticulture, a B.T in Plant Science, and a minor in English with a writing focus. She loves playing soccer on the beach, getting up early to watch the sunrise, and playing piano with the lights out.

Course Spotlight: The Gloss of 1 John 5:7-8

1 John 5:7-8 is a common passage in Scripture that secular Christians claim that the Bible supports the Trinity. How can we prove that these verses are not talking about God having a Trinitarian nature?

Course Spotlight From The General Epistles: (Part 2) The Letters of John and Jude